Os x leopard updating boot cache

03-Jun-2017 05:32

At this point you can release the keys and your Mac should boot as normal.

Note that settings such as resolution and system speaker volume will be set to defaults, so don’t be startled if your Mac’s startup chime is a bit louder on the second boot.

The Mac Startup Manager will update as needed, so if you add or remove bootable drives or devices on your Mac, the list will automatically display the current options.

You can use your mouse, trackpad, or keyboard to select the desired drive, and either click on its upward arrow button or press Return once you’ve made your selection.

To reset PRAM, shut down your Mac and find the Command, Option, P, and R keys on your keyboard.

You’re going to need to power your Mac up, and then press and hold all four keys simultaneously as soon as you hear the startup chime.

If you’ve ever worked in the Windows world, you may be familiar with Windows Safe Mode, which starts the operating system with the bare minimum level of drivers and software to help you isolate the cause of a software issue or conflict. Just as with its Windows counterpart, OS X Safe Boot should be used to help troubleshoot issues that may be caused by corrupt or incompatible software, or to help isolate software issues from hardware failures.

A recovery partition will be created by default on new OS X installations and upgrades, but not every Mac configuration is supported, including RAID system drives.You can let go of the keys when you see a screen similar to the screenshot below.Recovery Mode is possible thanks to the installation of a hidden recovery partition on your Mac’s hard drive, and allows the user to perform the aforementioned tasks without needing an OS X DVD or USB installer.You’ll also likely notice slower overall system and graphics performance, as OS X is using default drivers to help you track down your software or driver issue.You won’t want to use Safe Boot day-to-day, of course, as many common and useful functions are not available in this mode, but it is an essential step in troubleshooting your Mac.

A recovery partition will be created by default on new OS X installations and upgrades, but not every Mac configuration is supported, including RAID system drives.

You can let go of the keys when you see a screen similar to the screenshot below.

Recovery Mode is possible thanks to the installation of a hidden recovery partition on your Mac’s hard drive, and allows the user to perform the aforementioned tasks without needing an OS X DVD or USB installer.

You’ll also likely notice slower overall system and graphics performance, as OS X is using default drivers to help you track down your software or driver issue.

You won’t want to use Safe Boot day-to-day, of course, as many common and useful functions are not available in this mode, but it is an essential step in troubleshooting your Mac.

Keep holding Shift until you see a gray progress bar appear beneath the Apple boot logo.