Dating an abuse survivor

12-Oct-2017 18:19

“It’s one of those things you try to put at the back of your mind but it’s something I’ve thought about every day since,” said Alan, who is now 35.

The abuse started on his first night at the hospital, after he tried to hug his mother goodbye as she left.

“Nobody had anything diagnosed by any doctor as psychiatric problems,” he told .

“It was the last option for us – we were all children, 11 and 12-year-olds.” The fate of those children is now the subject of a police investigation spanning almost 30 years, from 1969 to when the Hill End Hospital Adolescent Unit closed in 1995. Detectives are appealing for former patients to come forward as they probe allegations of sexual and physical abuse.

Hertfordshire Constabulary have now set up a dedicated investigation, codenamed Operation Meadow, to probe the claims but Alan says he first reported his abuse two years ago and that officers had the chance to stop the horrors underway at Hill End decades before.

During his internment in 1993, he made a break for freedom when staff made a door unlocked after attempting to sedate him.

“We were beaten, we were punched, we were put in headlocks, we had our heads rammed into doors…I was one of the lucky ones because I wasn’t raped, but I know of other people who were.” Alan* was 11 years old when he was taken into Hill End Hospital Adolescent Unit in St Albans – a place where he was meant to be cared for alongside other vulnerable children.Alan says his own horrific experience is just one of “thousands” of similar accounts from survivors who have found each other online and had some of their cases taken on by a high-profile legal firm.He was at Hill End for six weeks but the ordeal has stayed with him for life.Get Help Our highly-trained advocates are available 24/7/365 to talk confidentially with anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship. Get Involved Making a difference in the lives of thousands of victims, survivors and their families is the best reason to give to The Hotline.Every donation helps ensure someone is available to answer the most important call of a victim’s life.

“We were beaten, we were punched, we were put in headlocks, we had our heads rammed into doors…I was one of the lucky ones because I wasn’t raped, but I know of other people who were.” Alan* was 11 years old when he was taken into Hill End Hospital Adolescent Unit in St Albans – a place where he was meant to be cared for alongside other vulnerable children.Alan says his own horrific experience is just one of “thousands” of similar accounts from survivors who have found each other online and had some of their cases taken on by a high-profile legal firm.He was at Hill End for six weeks but the ordeal has stayed with him for life.Get Help Our highly-trained advocates are available 24/7/365 to talk confidentially with anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship. Get Involved Making a difference in the lives of thousands of victims, survivors and their families is the best reason to give to The Hotline.Every donation helps ensure someone is available to answer the most important call of a victim’s life.Stay Safe Computer use can be monitored and is impossible to completely clear.